All the new Commissioning Groups in the South West

I was asked by a local charity whether I had details of all of the new Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) in the south west and which LINk and PCT related to which CCG. The CCGs are the groups that are taking over responsibility for health commissioning as part of the ‘NHS Reforms’. (See my post here for a nice simple explanation of the reforms.)

Well I rummaged through the piles of paper on my desk but I couldn’t find all the information in one place, so I’ve put it together in a spreadsheet for you:

LINks and CCGs in the south west

LINks and CCGs in the south west

It’s worth remembering that the LINk that covers any area will also be the same as the Local Authority (council) that covers the area. That’s useful because of course, the Local Authorities host the Health & Wellbeing Boards, which are another part of the new landscape.

CCGs (and PCTs) in the south west all mapped nicely:

This is a useful picture which is handy for the wall in the office. It shows all the PCT “Clusters” (i.e. the ‘merged’ PCTs which cover larger areas, which are merging to save on resources i.e. staff as everything is handed over the new CCGs) and how they relate (in terms of areas that they cover) to the new CCGs. It is Quite Interesting and if you work in this area, you should jolly well know all about it (click for a larger image):

CCGs and 'Cluster' PCTs in the south west

CCGs and ‘Cluster’ PCTs in the south west

The Devon Picture:

The situation in some areas is nice and simple. For example, in Somerset, we have one PCT (which has ‘clustered with itself’ – don’t ask), one local authority (i.e. council), one Clinical Commissioning Group and one LINk.  See how smug and sensible we are?

However, in other areas, such as Devon, you have a bit of a spaghetti of clustered PCTs and CCGs and LINks drunkenly sprawled all over each other with no apparent coherence or co-terminosity whatsoever.  Caroline at the Devon LINk sent me this handy PDF which explains the Devon situation in five maps, so if you are a Devon person, you might like to study these maps so that you can attempt to give yourself a migraine memorising the whole thing:

The new health landscape in Devon

The new health landscape in Devon

What to do with this data:

  • Print it out and stick it on the wall: It’s colourful and USEFUL. Hoorah.
  • Read it: This is all useful background information, to give you a flavour of how the new NHS landscape is shaping up in the south west.
  • Use the contact details: If you need to plan any work across the south west, these contact details should come in handy.
  • Tell me if I’m wrong or send me more information:Let me know if you have any useful maps of your area, or indeed if Devon is actually really simple and I’m just a bit dim.

P.S. Thanks to Mark Woodcock at the Strategic Health Authority for helping me find some of this data!


The NHS Reforms on one side of A4

What you can download here:

>> The NHS Reforms on one side of A4
>> The NHS Reforms in Somerset on one side of A4
>> The NHS Reforms document in PowerPoint, so you can make your own local version!

After explaining the NHS Reforms for the millionth time to a member of the public (in biro on the back of an NHS Catering serviette) I set myself the challenge of trying to produce a one-page diagram showing the very basics of the reforms.

Here is my final effort:

The NHS Reforms - on one side of A4

The NHS Reforms - on one side of A4

I decided to make it very simple and stick to the BIG MESSAGES, rather than attempting to capture the detail e.g. of clustering, which seems to make the most enthusiastic member of the public glaze over and start looking for their PPI sandwich rations, but so far this diagram seems to do the job. I think it gets the balance between boring people senseless and over-simplifying, but I’m very open to any suggested amendments.

And then I made a local version…

Well I liked this so much that I made a local version for Somerset, showing exactly what budgets were going where, and what the GP localities looked like in the county. So here is the local picture for Somerset:

The NHS Reforms in Somerset

The NHS Reforms: Somerset version

What to do with this data:

Enjoy!


Health and Wellbeing Boards: a digested read…

I keep being asked about Health and Wellbeing Boards, and what they are for exactly, so I’ve written a one-page Health and Wellbeing Board Briefing Paper summarising the basics.

Lots of people seem to think that Health and Wellbeing Boards are high-powered people (ok, that bit is about right…) sitting around a big bag of cash and pondering whether it should be spent on local charities, pot-holes or a nice yachting holiday. The reality is not quite as exciting, what with the bags of cash being somewhat depleted with the current economic situation etc etc…

Anyway, I thought this briefing paper might be useful for other people to hand out too, so here it is:

Health and Wellbeing Board Briefing Paper

Health and Wellbeing Board Briefing Paper

All about… Health and Wellbeing Boards

Health and Wellbeing Boards are a new idea, to bring together local commissioners to work together to jointly plan more efficient and effective services for local people.

Health and Wellbeing Boards bring together commissioners – who plan and buy local health, social care and children’s services – from the NHS, Public Health and Social Care, as well as local councillors and a patient representative (from LINk/Local Healthwatch).

What will Health & Wellbeing Boards do?

  • Challenges: The big pressures on public services include rising demand, rising health treatment costs – and the state of public finances.
  • Planning services: With increasing pressures on public finances, it will be the job of the board to work together to plan services that meet the needs of local people, while achieving best value for money.
  • Joint Strategic Needs Assessments: They will look at the evidence of what works best to help target plans and resources. They will be responsible for making sure that the local Joint Strategy Needs Assessment is written and that plans for services are based on this (the JSNA is a piece of research that every local authority has to undertake, which ‘tells the story’ of local people’s needs).
  • Joint Health & Wellbeing Strategy: They will be responsible for developing a local ‘Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy’, based on their JSNA. The Board will need to make sure that local services are in line with this Strategy.
  • Look at the big picture: The Board will look at people’s health and social care needs together, as well as taking into account the bigger picture – things like transport, housing, jobs and leisure – so that services help people stay healthy and independent.

A bit of background:

  • The idea for Health and Wellbeing Boards came from the Health and Social Care Bill, which is currently going through parliament. The Bill is part of the Government’s plans to change health and social care services and the way they are commissioned.
  • Some of the Bill’s key plans include giving clinicians, such as GPs, responsibility for commissioning health services, and strengthening ‘local accountability’ – for which Health and Wellbeing Boards will have a crucial role and responsibility.
  • All local authorities will have ‘shadow’ Health & Wellbeing Boards up and running by April 2012 and permanent boards will be in place by April 2013.

>> Download the Health and Wellbeing Board Briefing Paper in Word
>> Download the Health and Wellbeing Board Briefing paper in pdf

What to do with this information?

  • Carry this briefing paper around with you to helpfully hand out to members of the public who want to know all about Health and Wellbeing Boards. Or to third sector people who are convinced that the Board is sitting around a big pot of cash…

LINk-HealthWatch Representative Role Descriptions

This is just the sort of thing that we occasionally need to trawl the web for, so I thought I’d upload these LINk Representative Role Descriptions that I’ve written. Hopefully they will be of use to you, if you are starting to draft these sorts of things for your own LINk Reps.

In the new NHS landscape there are two new boards where LINk or HealthWatch Representatives are likely to be required: the Health and Wellbeing Board and the Clinical Commissioning Group. (In Somerset we have two very lovely LINk Reps who have already plunged into the deep end with these roles: Eilleen Tipper on our CCG and Diane Jepson on our H&WBB.)

The question of how the jiggerty we actually make these public representative roles work is something that I think everyone is struggling to get their heads around, and seems to be the main bit of work that lots of HealthWatch Pathfinders are focusing on. I’m not sure about the answer to that one just yet… but in the meantime, here are the role descriptions (in Word format) that we’ve got as a starter for ten here in Somerset.

How to use this information:

Hopefully these will be of use for anyone who is starting to draft their own role descriptions. Please let me know what you think, and if you think it’s utter drivel and have some suggestions for improvement, please let me know!