LINk Legacy Document – who should you send it to?

Since blogging on the LINk Legacy Document, I’ve been asked where LINks should send their Legacy Documents.

The Department of Health has told me that these documents are ‘primarily to inform local conversations’ – and in short, there is no one nationally who is collecting these. This seems a bit of a shame, as there must be lots of excellent work that is being gathered into these documents.

Anyway, here’s my list of people that I think could be on your Legacy Doc circulation list:

  • Your LINk commissioner
  • Your Local Healthwatch Commissioner
  • Your Healthwatch provider
  • PCT (outgoing!)
  • CCG (incoming!)
  • CQC contacts
  • Foundation Trusts
  • Independent Health Providers
  • Chair of your Health & Wellbeing Board (Maybe the whole Health & Wellbeing Board)
  • Councillor with oversight of Local Healthwatch contract
  • Your LINk mailing list
  • Your ‘LINk friends’ – FT Governors and others who have worked closely with you etc.
  • Local community groups and organisations that have an interest in Healthwatch

Let me know if you think there’s anyone else that I’ve missed!

It would also be worth publishing online in the following locations:

You can also use lots of your Legacy info in your Annual Report, which you should also upload to the Healthwatch England Information Hub in due course.

If you have any other ideas, let me know!

P.S. A great piece of LINk Legacy Work from Luton LINk

Debbie Roberts who has worked with the Luton LINk published this fab piece of work on the LINks Exchange website, which I love. She said: “In Luton one of the [Legacy] conversations was captured using graphic facilitation. Attached is the image of the wall map. Its size was around 3.5m x 1.5m and it had a strong impact on the people in the conversation and was a great tool to share messages with others.”

Luton LINk Legacy picture

Luton LINk Legacy picture – click for larger image

I love an infographic and if I was Luton Healthwatch, I would decorate the Healthwatch office using this as wallpaper. 🙂


LINk Legacy Document – here’s ours

It’s almost time for the LINks to wrap up their good work and pass the parcel on to Local Healthwatch.

Lots of local Healthwatches will be managed by new organisations, new staff and new volunteers – so we need to make sure that the knowledge and learning of the LINks is passed on.  One of the ways is with a Legacy Document – which the LGA recommends is written by each LINk as a parting gift to the incoming Healthwatch.

We’ve just finished writing ours in Somerset, and it’s now out for comment to the wider LINk and general public. So we thought we’d share this with you, in case you are still chewing your pencil and looking for some inspiration.

We couldn’t find any simple templates out there so we put this together with the aim of transferring as much of our knowledge as possible to the new organisation.

>> Download Somerset LINk Draft Legacy document

(It’s quite large – 5MB, so you will need to wait a minute or two for it to load)

Somerset LINk Legacy Document

Somerset LINk Legacy Document

Contents:

We structured the document in two parts: looking back at the LINk, and looking forward to Healthwatch:

Part 1 TELLING THE STORY OF THE SOMERSET LINK

  • What is the LINk Legacy Document?
  • Background
    What is Somerset like?
    Health and Social care in Somerset
  • LINk Lesson 1: Engagement
    How did we engage with the community?
    How did we engage with the third sector?
    How did we engage with stakeholders?
    Who are our stakeholders in health?
  • LINk Lesson 2: Communication
    Who was interested in the LINk?
  • LINk Lesson 3: Working with Volunteers
  • LINk Lesson 4: Our LINk Activity
    Our Projects: Research
    LINk Activity
    Enter & View
  • LINk Lesson 5: Equality & Diversity

PART 2: LOOKING FORWARD TO HEALTHWATCH SOMERSET

  • Ideas for Healthwatch Somerset
    Our Legacy Survey
  • Challenges: Our Risk Register
  • LINk Library
    List of key stakeholders
    Key Dates 2013
  • Thank you
    Appendix 1: Extracts from The Francis Report

Another useful document:

What to do with this data:

Hopefully it will be of some use or inspiration if you are still scribbling away at your Legacy Document.

(If you want this Legacy Document in Word, I’d be happy to send it to you – just email me at lucy.nicholls@helpandcare.org.uk.)


Patient Inspections and Local Healthwatch: from PEAT to PLACE

There’s a lot of new Healthwatch info being published  – check out the new Healthwatch website at www.healthwatch.co.uk  – and one of the many new tasks for Local Healthwatch is involvement with new patient-led inspections. The info about this seems a bit fragmented, so to be nice and helpful I thought I’d try to summarise it here.

Patient-led inspections?! How did that sneak into my Healthwatch basket?!

David Cameron announced in January of this year that current PEAT (Patient Environment Action Teams) inspections would be replaced by new patient-led inspections, which will be known as Patient-Led Assessments of the Care Environment or PLACE.

What are (… were … ) PEAT inspections?

PEAT inspections, as they are known, have been going on since 2000. PEAT stands for ‘Patient Environment Action Teams’.  PEAT Teams are made up of NHS staff (such as nurses, matrons, doctors, catering managers, directors etc.) and also patients and patient representatives.

PEAT inspections are an annual event for all NHS sites that have more than 10 beds.  The PEAT teams look at non-clinical aspects of patient care – such as the environment, food, privacy and dignity – basically everything from how clean the floor is to how tasty the jelly is…

NHS sites and trusts are given scores from 1 (unacceptable) to 5 (excellent). The idea is that the inspections produce scores for each site to encourage them to improve their services – and to share best practice.

How are the new PLACE assessments going to work?

The final details haven’t been decided yet – but the new assessments are being piloted this October. A total of 68 hospitals are currently involved in pilot PLACE assessments. The Pilot assessments will run from 1 October to 12 October 2012. You can read the documentation that the hospitals have been sent here. They will be similar to the current PEAT inspections but with more lay members/patients on the teams (over 50% of the team members must be patients).

How will Local Healthwatch be involved?

Local Healthwatch will of course be the ‘new consumer champion for health and social care’ – and hopefully a source of eager patient representatives champing at the bit to do This Sort Of Thing. Local Healthwatches – like LINks – will decide what work they get involved with  so they might decide that they don’t want to get involved with the new PLACE assessments. But the initial message seems to be that Local Healthwatch should be invited to have a key role in the new PLACE assessments.

Which hospitals are taking part in the Pilot PLACE assessments?

Here’s a list of all the hospitals that are taking part (the list names the Trust and then the name of the hospital):

  • Sheffield Children’s, Sheffield Children’s
  • Salisbury NHSFT, Salisbury
  • Avon And Wiltshire, Callington Road
  • Worcester Acute, Redditch
  • Birmingham And Solihull, Ardenleigh
  • Royal Wolverhampton, New Cross
  • Sheffield Teaching, Northern General
  • Manchester Mh And Sc, Park House
  • Morecambe Bay NHS FT, Royal Lancaster
  • Leeds Teaching, St James
  • Devon Partnership, Langdon
  • Leicestershire Partnership, Evington Centre
  • Nuffield, Plymouth
  • Pennine Care, Fairfield General
  • S/W Yorkshire Partnership, Fieldhead
  • Bmi, Rochdale
  • East Cheshire NHS Trust, Congleton
  • Yeovil District NHSFT, Yeovil District
  • Bedford Hospitals NHS Trust, Bedford
  • Barking Havering And Redbridge, Queens Hospital
  • Chesterfield Royal NHS FT, Chesterfield Royal
  • Queen Victoria, Queen Victoria
  • West London Mh, St Bernards
  • Norfolk And Suffolk NHS FT, Hellesdon
  • Birmingham Women’s, Birmingham Women’s
  • Pennine Acute, North Manchester
  • South West London And St Georges, Springfield
  • Norfolk And Norwich, Norfolk And Norwich
  • Kent And Medway Partnership, Thanet
  • West Kent , Gravesham
  • Uclh, Heart Hospital
  • Southern Health, Parklands
  • York Teaching, York
  • Royal Brompton, Royal Brompton
  • Royal Liverpool And Broadgreen, Royal Liverpool
  • North Cumbria University, Cumberland Infirmary
  • Central And N/W London, Park Royal
  • Spire Healthcare, Harpenden
  • Western Sussex, St Richards & Worthing
  • Central Manchester, Central Manchester
  • Medway Maritime NHSFT, Medway Maritime
  • Dorset Healthcare, Blandford
  • Gloucestershire, Cheltenham General
  • South Tees, Friarage Hospital
  • University Hospitals Bristol, St Micheals
  • Southport And Ormskirk, Ormskirk
  • South Warwickshire NHS FT, Leamington Spa
  • Liverpool Heart And Chest, Liverpool Heart And Chest
  • Tees Esk And Wear Valley, West Park
  • Nottingham University, Nottingham City
  • Humber NHS FT, East Riding Community
  • Barts Health, Whipps Cross
  • Cambridge University Hospitals, Addenbrookes
  • North Staffs Combined, Harplands
  • Plymouth Hospitals NHS T, Derriford
  • 5 Boroughs Partnership, Hollins Park
  • Royal National Orthopaedic, Stanmore
  • Ramsay Healthcare, Colchester
  • Anglian Community CIC, Clacton And Harwich
  • Calderstones Partnership, Calderstones
  • Surrey Community, Woking Community
  • St Georges Healthcare, St Georges
  • County Durham And Darlington (Ex County Durham PCT), Richardson Hospital
  • Nottinghamshire Healthcare, Rampton High Secure
  • Leicester University, Leicester Royal
  • Papworth Hospital NHS FT, Papworth
  • South Staffordshire An Shropshire Healthcare, St George’s
  • Hinchingbrooke Healthcare, Hinchingbrooke
  • County Durham And Darlington NHS FT, Darlington

Some useful links:

What to do with this data:

  • Make sure your LINk understands that PEAT inspections are changing and – once established – Local Healthwatch should be offered the chance to be involved in the new PLACE assessments.
  • Check the list of Pilot areas to see whether your local hospital/s are involved. If so, get in touch with the hospital (ask for someone with ‘Director’ and ‘Nursing’ in their job title…) to ask whether you can be a part of the Pilot – or at least kept informed of developments.

Local HealthWatch Briefing Paper v.2

Everyone seemed to like my Local HealthWatch Briefing Paper which I scribbled in October last year, but a few things have changed since then. I wouldn’t want you all wandering around with an outdated briefing paper in your paw, so I’ve put together a brand new version which hopefully reflects what we know at the moment.

>>> Download the HealthWatch Briefing v2 February 2012

HealthWatch Briefing Paper V2

HealthWatch Briefing Paper V2

 

What to do with this information:

  • Gently pass it to your Local Authority Local HealthWatch Commissioner, who is probably crying at his/her desk;
  • Have a read and let me know what I’ve missed, and drop me an email to let me know!

LINk-HealthWatch Representative Role Descriptions

This is just the sort of thing that we occasionally need to trawl the web for, so I thought I’d upload these LINk Representative Role Descriptions that I’ve written. Hopefully they will be of use to you, if you are starting to draft these sorts of things for your own LINk Reps.

In the new NHS landscape there are two new boards where LINk or HealthWatch Representatives are likely to be required: the Health and Wellbeing Board and the Clinical Commissioning Group. (In Somerset we have two very lovely LINk Reps who have already plunged into the deep end with these roles: Eilleen Tipper on our CCG and Diane Jepson on our H&WBB.)

The question of how the jiggerty we actually make these public representative roles work is something that I think everyone is struggling to get their heads around, and seems to be the main bit of work that lots of HealthWatch Pathfinders are focusing on. I’m not sure about the answer to that one just yet… but in the meantime, here are the role descriptions (in Word format) that we’ve got as a starter for ten here in Somerset.

How to use this information:

Hopefully these will be of use for anyone who is starting to draft their own role descriptions. Please let me know what you think, and if you think it’s utter drivel and have some suggestions for improvement, please let me know!

 

 


NHS Organograms – the old vs. the new

The poor Datagoat has been rather neglected of late, but I have a nice juicy organogram to cheer us all up.  I am working on some other bits and pieces too, but this was too delicious not to share.

The Westminster Blog has published these fabbie organograms showing how the structure of the NHS is changing.  Click on the smaller images in the blog and they will take you to larger, clearer images.

The Westminster Blog

A yummy organogram

What to do with this data

The diagrams speak for themselves which is why I love them so much.  They are very useful for conveying to people some of the enormous complexity of how things are changing.

I have printed them out and stuck them on the wall of the datagoat’s pen so I can admire them during the day, and I recommend that you do the same.*

*They have actually missed out Local HealthWatches, so you will need to draw those on with a crayon.